Photoshop

Firework Photography Tips

Hello world!

I really hope everyone had a wonderful and safe 4th of July.

In this weeks photography class the topic was about fireworks and how to capture them. The instructor told us what setting to use, so I decided to try it out myself.

Here are the steps:

#1 – You need to be on a tripod and use a shutter release button (if you don’t have one use the camera self timer).

#2 – Keep your ISO as low as you can to avoided any grain.

#3 – Use manual mode and set an aperture of f11 – f16.

#4 – Set your lens to manual focus, frame your shot and focus it.

#5 – Press the shutter and let the camera do its magic.

**Please remember that if your lens has a vibration reduction switch make sure you set it to off while on a tripod**

This is what I was able to capture and let me say that It was a lot of fun 😊

IMG_8338.JPG

My Photo settings:    F11    1/30    ISO 100     (auto white balance / focal length 80 mm)

You can view the rest in my firework photos in my photography section

You can use these settings for any night photography.

Have a blessed day and let’s go out there and get creative!

For further information please feel free to contact me!

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Best Regards,

Alondra Lopez

 

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How Do I Design – Thursday’s Designer Tip

GS_New

Hey guy!

Here is Thursday’s designer tip 🙂

When I create graphics my main design program is Adobe Illustrator. I use Illustrator because it creates vector files (a digital graphic file that its made up of many lines and curves or better known as paths). With a vector file you can stretch out your design as big or small as you want without losing resolution quality.

When I edit photos, I use Photoshop because PS creates a raster image (an image composed of pixels).

You can design in either programs, I just prefer Illustrator for designs and Photoshop for photos.

When I open up a new Illustrator file, I create the document using the final size of the project including the bleed when required.

1

Creating new doc sized at: 3.75″ X 2.25″

For example, a business card is 3.5” x 2” if it does not require a bleed I make my doc size 3.5” x 2”. If my card requires a bleed my doc size will be 3.75” x 2.25” giving me a .25” bleed for trimming. Inside the card I will also keep an inner safety border of .25” all around.

2

Example of doc with colored safety frame.

I work with layer so my first one is my safety border, you can use the guides in AI or I prefer to make a colored frame sized at .25” so its easier on my eyes. I will align the frame to the edges of the document. Next, I make sure to lock my guide layer so nothing is moved.

3

Layer 1: Guides (Locked) Layer 2: Artwork

My 2nd layer is my artwork layer, this one I will keep under my 1st layer. Once my design is complete, I group everything in the artwork layer and delete layer 1 (guides). I will select my artwork layer and outline all of my text and save the file as a PDF or EPS making sure to keep the original (not outlined) text file for future changes.

**It is important to outline your text because if you send your file to someone and they don’t have that fonts you used in your design installed the program will substitute the missing fonts with other font causing your design to look different.**

**Outlining the text makes the font an object and it will no longer be editable as far as characteristics for future use so make sure you keep the original file.**

I hope this helps you in some way. If it does let me know 🙂

Have a blessed day and let’s go out there and get creative!

For further information please feel free to contact me!

Twitter   |  Instagram   |   LinkedIn

Best Regards,

Alondra Lopez